The Best Mortgage Rates

Most consumers planning to obtain a home loan are looking around to find the best interest rate possible for their situation. This is an important aspect to financing because a small fluctuation in your mortgage rate can mean tens of thousands of dollars difference over the life of your loan.

Here are some important tips to use so you can minimize your mortgage interest rate and maximize the use of your money:

Raise your credit score:

Lenders will look at your credit score to determine whether they will continue looking at your mortgage application or reject it immediately. The best mortgage rates are generally obtained by consumers with a FICO credit score of 740 and up.

Achieving a 740+ credit score requires attention to the factors that make up your credit score, and how much impact they have: payment history (35%), credit utilization ratio (30%), length of account history (15%), recent credit inquiries (10%), and the types of credit you use (10%).

Make your payments on time and keep your balances as low as possible, while still using at least 1% of your credit limit. Using a small portion of your credit limit keeps your credit cards active in the FICO formula and maximizes the impact of the credit utilization portion of your FICO score.

Improve your debt-to-income ratio:

First, consider your “front-end” debt ratio, this is the amount of your pre-tax monthly income that goes toward your mortgage payment, this should not exceed 28%. Develop a detailed budget before applying for a loan so you understand what you can afford on a monthly basis.

Second, your “back-end” debt ratio, or the portion of your monthly income that goes toward all forms of debt pay off including; mortgage, student loans, car loans, etc. should not exceed 36%.

To appear as a lower-risk borrower, take care of your “back-end” ratio to improve your debt-to-income ratio, while also improving your credit utilization.

Consider short-term fixed-rate mortgage:

You have a good chance of getting the best mortgage rate possible by choosing a 15 year fixed-rate mortgage over a 30 year fixed-rate mortgage. This option can improve your interest rate by as much as 0.8% compared to a 30 year loan.

However one of the risks of utilizing a 15 year mortgage may outweigh the reward for many buyers. Having a much higher monthly payment will put strains on your budget and may cause late payments. Choosing a 30 year loan and paying it off sooner won’t give you a lower interest rate, but it will allow you to pay your debt more according to your own terms, avoiding potentially being strapped for cash when you run into an unforeseen hardship.

Larger down payment:

Lenders can give you lower mortgage rates for the life of the loan if they can get more money upfront. This is called paying for points. A point is 1% of the borrowed amount, the more points you can buy, the lower your interest rate will be. The longer you plan to hold the loan, the more it makes sense to pay for the points that will save you money.

No matter what course of action you take to lower your mortgage interest rates, utilizing a combination of all these methods will surely provide the best results. Get creative in your efforts and remember the end result – saving money!

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Each person’s credit situation is unique. Results may vary, and CreditServices.com makes no guarantee of any particular result. The information in this site is intended for general informational purposes only, and is not to be construed as legal, tax, accounting, or other professional advice.  As such, it should not be used as, or relied upon, as a substitute for seeking professional legal, tax, accounting, or other advice. All information in this site is provided “as-is”, with no guarantee of completeness, accuracy, timeliness, or other results obtained from its use. In no event is CreditServices.com, its Affiliates, or their agents or employees liable to you or anyone else for any decision made or action taken in reliance on the information in this site. “Affiliate” means any entity that directly or indirectly owns or controls, is owned or controlled by, or is under common ownership or common control of the party in question.

Are You Hurting Your Credit Profile?

Credit scores have a large impact on our financial success. Having a strong score means you have the opportunity to take advantage of the best available interest rates on mortgages, auto loans, refinancing student loans, even cheaper auto insurance. To get good interest rates, you typically need to have a score above 700, but the best deals will go to consumers with scores above 750.

Credit scores reward responsible behavior, if you live within your means and pay your bills on time you should have a good score. However, being responsible does not always mean that you will have a strong credit score.

Here are three common mistakes that responsible people make, costing them points on their credit score, and money in the long run.

  1. Having only one credit card, and using it for everything.

Many consumers limit themselves to one credit card and pay their balance in full every month. This is a great practice as you avoid getting charged interest on the account. However, using only one card could harm your credit score by driving up your credit utilization ratio, an important part of how your score is calculated.

Your credit utilization is the percentage of available credit that is being used. If you have a credit limit of $1,000 and a balance of $200, your utilization would be 20%. This is calculated for each individual credit card and across all credit card accounts. High utilization can have a significant negative impact on your score. Keep utilization below 20%, but if you want the biggest positive effect on your score, keep it between 1-3%.

Utilization is important to lenders for two reasons. First, high utilization shows them you can’t control your spending. If you consistently max out your credit cards, you appear to be very risky to lend to. Second, credit limits are calculated based on your income, so when you use too much of the credit available to you, banks will think you have too much debt relative to your income, whether you pay them off in full or not.

You can lower your utilization in two ways. First, you can make your credit card payments more frequently. Your goal is to keep your balances low, but still more than zero. Paying down your balance in the middle of the month will reduce your statement balance and your utilization. Second, you can ask your bank for a credit limit increase, which will increase your available credit, making your statement balance have a lower effect on your utilization.

  1. Not knowing what is on your credit report.

Strange things often appear on credit reports. Check your credit reports once a year to make sure that all accounts are accurate and up to date. If you see any incorrect information on your credit report, you need to take action. CreditServices.com is an industry-leading credit repair company, our Attorney-Reviewed service levels can help you get negative remarks removed from your credit report.

  1. Paying collection items first.

Every once in awhile, you may run into unforeseen problems and miss payments. Responsible consumers work hard to pay back all of the money they have borrowed. However, when it comes to your credit score, keeping active accounts current is more important than paying on a collection item.

Once a collection item appears on your credit report, the damage has been done. So skipping credit card payments to pay the collection will negatively impact your credit score even more.

Collections should be dealt with only after your obligation to active creditors has been fulfilled in order to maintain your credit score and avoid further damage. Also consider working with our Debt Settlement department to settle your collections and save yourself money.

Credit scores are complex.

Making the most of your credit score, and protecting your financial future is not easy. A lot of information goes into calculating your credit score, which can get overwhelming at times. Since credit is such an important factor in so many purchasing situations, you need to have a firm grasp on where your credit profile stands. CreditServices.com can help repair negative items on your credit report, while also teaching you how to better manage the accounts you have, and inform you as to if you should open or close any other accounts based on your current profile. Our Credit Advisors are experts on the FICO formula and can help you develop a better understanding of how to manage your accounts now and in the future.

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Each person’s credit situation is unique. Results may vary, and CreditServices.com makes no guarantee of any particular result. The information in this site is intended for general informational purposes only, and is not to be construed as legal, tax, accounting, or other professional advice.  As such, it should not be used as, or relied upon, as a substitute for seeking professional legal, tax, accounting, or other advice. All information in this site is provided “as-is”, with no guarantee of completeness, accuracy, timeliness, or other results obtained from its use. In no event is CreditServices.com, its Affiliates, or their agents or employees liable to you or anyone else for any decision made or action taken in reliance on the information in this site. “Affiliate” means any entity that directly or indirectly owns or controls, is owned or controlled by, or is under common ownership or common control of the party in question.

Back To School Shopping? Keep Your Credit In Mind!

As parents, you are well aware that back to school shopping can seriously impact your financial situation. Overspending on school supplies and clothes could easily result in a damaged credit profile as well.

Using credit cards for your back to school shopping can be very helpful, allowing you to purchase the necessities for your children in the upcoming school year. However, be careful about racking up high balances as doing so will hurt your credit utilization ratio. This ratio is based on the amount of debt you are carrying vs. how much revolving credit is available to you, it is the second most important aspect of the FICO formula, accounting for 30% of your FICO score. If your credit utilization ratio is too high, it will imply that you may be overextending your finances, making you appear as a risk to lenders.

Before you start shopping, you will want to know how much debt you are carrying on your credit cards, especially if you are planning to apply for any lending opportunities in the near future. You can see what your balances and limits are by pulling your credit and examining your open revolving accounts. Pay down any cards that are already getting close to their limit as soon as you can, as it is certainly causing your credit score to suffer.

Stick to your budget to avoid a revolving balance and paying interest on your back to school purchases. A helpful trick to manage this is to spread out your school spending. Buy clothing when it goes on sale if you can, and for supplies, keep an eye on the adds as certain items are often on a rotating sale.

If at all possible, pay cash, and if not, make sure to keep an eye on your balances and make your payments on time.

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Each person’s credit situation is unique. Results may vary, and CreditServices.com makes no guarantee of any particular result. The information in this site is intended for general informational purposes only, and is not to be construed as legal, tax, accounting, or other professional advice.  As such, it should not be used as, or relied upon, as a substitute for seeking professional legal, tax, accounting, or other advice. All information in this site is provided “as-is”, with no guarantee of completeness, accuracy, timeliness, or other results obtained from its use. In no event is CreditServices.com, its Affiliates, or their agents or employees liable to you or anyone else for any decision made or action taken in reliance on the information in this site. “Affiliate” means any entity that directly or indirectly owns or controls, is owned or controlled by, or is under common ownership or common control of the party in question.

Your Credit Reports

A credit report is a record of your credit history which includes information such as:

-Your identity: name, address, date of birth, Social Security Number, and potentially employment information.

-Your existing credit: information pertaining to your credit history including revolving (credit cards) and installment accounts (student loans, car loans, mortgages…), how much you owe, and your payment history.

-Public records: Information regarding any judgments, tax liens, or bankruptcy in your credit history.

-Credit inquiries: List of companies or parties that recently requested a copy of your credit report for the purpose of lending.

Your credit report is used by lenders, insurers, employers, and others to assess your management of financial responsibilities.

-Lenders will use your reports to determine whether you will qualify for a loan, and what interest rate you will receive.

-Insurers can use them to approve or deny you for insurance coverage and to set your rates.

-Utility companies may use your credit report to determine whether they should provide you with their services.

-Employers, if given permission, may use credit reports in their hiring decision.

-Landlords may use the information on your credit report to determine whether they will rent to you or someone else.

Your information is collected by three major credit bureaus; Equifax, Experian, and Transunion. They gather the information that is contained in your credit reports, then provide the information to companies that request it to make the decision on whether to do business with you.

The credit bureaus have to manage all of this information on millions of Americans, so how accurate do you think all of the information is? Credit bureaus are not responsible for the accuracy of the information that they supply to lenders, that is your job!

Check your credit reports if you haven’t in awhile to make sure they are accurate, if they aren’t, contact us and we can get you started on the right path to achieve your goals.

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Each person’s credit situation is unique. Results may vary, and CreditServices.com makes no guarantee of any particular result. The information in this site is intended for general informational purposes only, and is not to be construed as legal, tax, accounting, or other professional advice.  As such, it should not be used as, or relied upon, as a substitute for seeking professional legal, tax, accounting, or other advice. All information in this site is provided “as-is”, with no guarantee of completeness, accuracy, timeliness, or other results obtained from its use. In no event is CreditServices.com, its Affiliates, or their agents or employees liable to you or anyone else for any decision made or action taken in reliance on the information in this site. “Affiliate” means any entity that directly or indirectly owns or controls, is owned or controlled by, or is under common ownership or common control of the party in question.

Negative Items On Your Credit?

Many of your neighbors, friends, and coworkers are unable to take advantage of the best, or even average interest rates on credit cards, auto loans, and mortgages. The best interest rates are only for those with excellent credit. So if you want to take advantage of historically low interest rates before they rise, you need to take a look at your credit, and get active improving your profile.

Most Americans are also unaware of what makes up their credit score, including what will make it subprime, and how long these negative items stick to your credit profile. So how long do some of these negative items impact your financial situation?

Bankruptcy:

One of the most negative items you can have on your profile is a bankruptcy. Chapter 13 bankruptcies will stay on your credit report for 7 years, while a Chapter 7 bankruptcy will impact your credit score for 10 years from the date that you filed for the paperwork. If your bankruptcy was dismissed and your debts weren’t discharged, then it will stay on your report for 10 years from the date it was dismissed. If you had a strong credit score in the past and you declare bankruptcy, you will see a large impact on your credit score. If you previously had subprime or bad credit, then the impact of bankruptcy won’t be as great. If your bankruptcy included numerous accounts, the impact can be serious.

Lawsuits and Judgments:

If you have been sued, or had a judgment against you, it will also stay on your credit report for up to 7 years from the date it was filed, made against you, or until the statute of limitations has expired. Once you have paid off the judgment against you, even though paid off, it will impact your credit score for 7 years.

Tax Liens:

Even when you pay them off as soon as possible, the tax lien will stay on your credit report for 7 years.

Delinquent Accounts:

A delinquent account will also affect your credit profile for 7 years from the date that the account was declared delinquent. If you catch up on your payments, and maintain a good payment history, the negative mark will still remain for 7 years. Payment history makes up 35% of your FICO score. This, combined with the fact that the negative mark will stay on your report for 7 years is why on-time payments are crucial to having a good credit score.

Repossessions and Collections:

Any time that you have an account referred to a collection agency, or have something like a car or major appliance repossessed, it will have an impact on your credit score. These marks will stay on your credit report for 7 years plus 6 months after the first missed payment. If there is a charge-off marked on your report, that means that after the 6 months of non-payment, the company has removed it from their balance sheet, but you still owe the debt. Unpaid debts on your credit profile will make it difficult to get any credit in the future. Take care of your debts on time unless you want them to stick with you for 7 years or more.

Child Support:

Just like any other legally binding debt such as credit card payments, mortgage payments, or student loans, if you get behind, or make late payments, they will remain on your credit report for 7 years. Treat them like any other account, and make the payments on time.

Student Loans:

Student loan debt is guaranteed or insured by the federal government, so they carry much more serious consequences than other types of debt. You cannot discharge student loans by declaring bankruptcy, and defaulting on your student loans will stay on your credit report for much longer than 7 years.

Credit Inquiries:

Inquiries will show up on your credit any time that you apply for a new form of credit. They can stay on your report for 2 years, but only impact your score for the first 12 months. This will not have a disastrous impact on your score, however, they cost you 5-15 points each, so too many inquiries can significantly lower your credit score.

What you can do to clean up your credit profile:

While it is not an easy process, disputing the accounts on your profile can help you get rid of some of the negative remarks on your profile. Aside from challenging your negative accounts, CreditServices.com will teach you how to build positive accounts on your credit profile to counteract any negatives that might remain, speeding up the process of improving your financial situation.

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Each person’s credit situation is unique. Results may vary, and CreditServices.com makes no guarantee of any particular result. The information in this site is intended for general informational purposes only, and is not to be construed as legal, tax, accounting, or other professional advice.  As such, it should not be used as, or relied upon, as a substitute for seeking professional legal, tax, accounting, or other advice. All information in this site is provided “as-is”, with no guarantee of completeness, accuracy, timeliness, or other results obtained from its use. In no event is CreditServices.com, its Affiliates, or their agents or employees liable to you or anyone else for any decision made or action taken in reliance on the information in this site. “Affiliate” means any entity that directly or indirectly owns or controls, is owned or controlled by, or is under common ownership or common control of the party in question.

Save On Your Next Car: 6 Tips

Purchasing a new vehicle can be a very stressful situation. Make sure you do all of the research that you need in order to feel comfortable making your decision, and you won’t leave with a sense of buyer’s remorse.

Here are 6 important tips that will help you save money on your next car.

1.Find your financing before you shop.

It is widely known that paying cash will save you the most money on your new vehicle purchase (as you will not be paying any interest). However, if you are unable to dish out the cash, explore your financial options outside of the dealerships or car lots. Obtain pre-approval from your bank or credit union for the lowest interest rate possible, potentially saving you thousands. Independent financing will give you more buying power than relying on the finance department at the dealership.

  1. Check your credit profile.

The interest rate you receive depends significantly on your credit score. Your credit score is used by lenders to determine how risky it is to lend you money, and will adjust the interest rates according to their evaluation. In order to make sure the lender’s assessment of you is as accurate as possible, check your credit reports for inaccuracies. Do this a few months before shopping so there is time to fix these inaccuracies and improve the interest rate you receive.

  1. Compare available APRs.

Typically, the loan rates you are offered are shown as an annual percentage rate or APR. APR includes interest and fees, allowing you to compare loans in an apples-to-apples fashion. A lower APR will save you money over the length of your loan and lower your monthly payment. In order to determine which type of loan will work best for you, use an online loan calculator to experiment with loan amounts, interest rates and loan terms.

  1. Avoid long-term loans.

Longer-term auto loans have become increasingly popular as monthly budgeting concerns are often taken into consideration more than the total price paid over the life of the loan. Terms as long as 84 months are being reported more frequently than ever before. Though these loans are gaining in popularity, this does not mean they are a good idea. A longer loan will provide lower monthly payments but you will end up paying much higher interest. Keep your term as short as you can while still being able to fit it in your budget.

  1. Compare rates and terms.

Shop around for the best interest rates and loan terms available. A dealership may be able to offer you the best rates for your situation, with some new car purchases being financed at 0% for 60-72 months to buyers with great credit. If the dealership is not offering incentives on brand new vehicles, credit unions will likely offer you the best rates, educate yourself on your options.

  1. Focus on total cost.

Don’t get burned, concentrate on the total cost of the loan you are applying for rather than the monthly payment. The best options for lowering the total amount of your loan are to bring in a trade-in or a significant down payment.

The bottom line:

Do your research, exercise your options, and make sure your credit is going to help you obtain approval. If your credit leaves some room for improvement, CreditServices.com can help you.

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Each person’s credit situation is unique. Results may vary, and CreditServices.com makes no guarantee of any particular result. The information in this site is intended for general informational purposes only, and is not to be construed as legal, tax, accounting, or other professional advice.  As such, it should not be used as, or relied upon, as a substitute for seeking professional legal, tax, accounting, or other advice. All information in this site is provided “as-is”, with no guarantee of completeness, accuracy, timeliness, or other results obtained from its use. In no event is CreditServices.com, its Affiliates, or their agents or employees liable to you or anyone else for any decision made or action taken in reliance on the information in this site. “Affiliate” means any entity that directly or indirectly owns or controls, is owned or controlled by, or is under common ownership or common control of the party in question.

Millennials: Build Credit Now

Many millennials saw their parents hit a very rocky financial situation during the Great Recession, creating a fear of credit among the generation. Understanding the difference between credit and debt is the most important aspect of getting over this fear. Credit is a financial tool, that when used correctly can provide you with valuable purchasing power. Debt is a problem caused by the misuse of credit.

millennials credit cards

Using credit wisely is an incredibly important aspect of becoming financially successful now and in the future.

 

Your credit history is everything you have done in the past with regards to using credit. Credit history includes the amount of credit you have used, your payment habits, and if creditors have had to resort to using collections agencies or the legal system to get you to repay your debts.

When considering whether or not to lend you money, a lender will attempt to determine what the odds are that you will repay a debt. Your credit history is the best indicator they have of your credit risk. They assume that you will continue to behave in the future as you have in the past. But if you have no past use of credit, they will view you as risky because they have no record of you being willing and able to manage debt.

After establishing a credit history, you will want to make sure that your reports are reflecting accurate information to ensure that you aren’t being judged unfairly. Lenders look to your credit profile as a record of your credit history and they will likely assume that the accounts listed in your credit reports are accurate. The problem is that very often these items are inaccurate or untimely, misleading, incomplete, unverifiable, biased or unclear.

If your credit reports contain questionable negative items, you have the right to dispute them in an effort to get them corrected or removed entirely. CreditServices.com will help you make sure your profile is reporting accurately, and teach you how to build your credit. We have helped thousands of people with unfair credit reports, and we can help you too!

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Each person’s credit situation is unique. Results may vary, and CreditServices.com makes no guarantee of any particular result. The information in this site is intended for general informational purposes only, and is not to be construed as legal, tax, accounting, or other professional advice.  As such, it should not be used as, or relied upon, as a substitute for seeking professional legal, tax, accounting, or other advice. All information in this site is provided “as-is”, with no guarantee of completeness, accuracy, timeliness, or other results obtained from its use. In no event is CreditServices.com, its Affiliates, or their agents or employees liable to you or anyone else for any decision made or action taken in reliance on the information in this site. “Affiliate” means any entity that directly or indirectly owns or controls, is owned or controlled by, or is under common ownership or common control of the party in question.

Credit Monitoring: The Benefits

Many consumers think credit monitoring services are only necessary for those with a troubled credit history, but that is not the case. In fact, it is just as important to use a credit monitoring service to maintain an excellent credit rating as it is to improve a poor one.

When you sign up for a credit monitoring service, you will receive important information from your major credit reports through Equifax, Experian and TransUnion. You will be able to track all of them and make sure that any information reported is accurate.

In addition to avoiding inaccurate marks on your file, you can figure out where the weak points in your profile exist and improve them going forward. Most credit monitoring services show the major factors in calculating your credit score and grade you on each of them. As a result, you can determine how to adjust your financial approach to improve your credit rating. This will impact your chances of obtaining important financing options like a car or home loan.

Credit Protection

Credit monitoring services can also help protect you from identity theft, which is increasingly important because so much of our information is stored online. Unfortunately, credit card fraud and identity theft are commonplace these days. Cyber criminals are able to hack the databases of major companies obtaining credit card information, so nobody’s information is entirely safe.

Information is power when it comes to improving your personal finances. Monitor your credit use on a regular basis and ensure that your reports are reflecting accurate information. Catching inaccuracies early allows you time to correct them, meaning they are not there to prevent you from being approved!

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Each person’s credit situation is unique. Results may vary, and CreditServices.com makes no guarantee of any particular result. The information in this site is intended for general informational purposes only, and is not to be construed as legal, tax, accounting, or other professional advice.  As such, it should not be used as, or relied upon, as a substitute for seeking professional legal, tax, accounting, or other advice. All information in this site is provided “as-is”, with no guarantee of completeness, accuracy, timeliness, or other results obtained from its use. In no event is CreditServices.com, its Affiliates, or their agents or employees liable to you or anyone else for any decision made or action taken in reliance on the information in this site. “Affiliate” means any entity that directly or indirectly owns or controls, is owned or controlled by, or is under common ownership or common control of the party in question.

Ready For Car Shopping?

Your credit score influences the rates that are available to you. Most lenders will not fully review your credit profile, instead they rely mostly on your credit score and some application information.

customer and salesman with car key
transportation and ownership concept – customer and salesman with car key outside

If you have a 750+ credit score, you will receive the best interest rates available, which can sometimes be as low as 0%! However, people with major credit problems can usually be approved for auto loans, but at very high rates. The best auto loan rates are generally offered by credit unions, and online lenders, not at the dealership.

When shopping for your loans, remember that you have a 30 day window where similar inquiries will be counted as one and only drop your score 5-15 points rather than multiple inquiries that will be 5-15 points each.

Educate yourself, monitor your credit, and stay within your means to get the most out of your auto loan.

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Each person’s credit situation is unique. Results may vary, and CreditServices.com makes no guarantee of any particular result. The information in this site is intended for general informational purposes only, and is not to be construed as legal, tax, accounting, or other professional advice.  As such, it should not be used as, or relied upon, as a substitute for seeking professional legal, tax, accounting, or other advice. All information in this site is provided “as-is”, with no guarantee of completeness, accuracy, timeliness, or other results obtained from its use. In no event is CreditServices.com, its Affiliates, or their agents or employees liable to you or anyone else for any decision made or action taken in reliance on the information in this site. “Affiliate” means any entity that directly or indirectly owns or controls, is owned or controlled by, or is under common ownership or common control of the party in question.

Master Credit Card Use: 3 Tips

  1. Pay Mid-Cycle

The balances appearing on your credit reports are usually based on the balance at the end of your billing cycle. Go online to make a payment a few days before the end of the billing cycle so the balance that gets reported to the credit bureaus is lower.

shopper

  1. Avoid Paying Interest

Credit Card users who do not carry balances every month and have signed up with a credit card that offers a grace period have at least 21 days from the time of purchase to pay the charge in full without accruing interest. Grace periods will not be included for balance transfers or cash advances.

  1. Increase Your Limit

Request a higher limit on your credit card to protect your credit rating. Raising the gap between your balance and limit will give you a better credit utilization ratio, which will be favorable for your credit score. Be careful with this tip though, just because the money is available doesn’t mean you should use it, simply use it as a credit building technique.

CreditServices.com credit advisors will walk you through the credit repair process, coaching you on valuable credit building techniques like these. These tips are very effective, and when advised on exactly what time to utilize these tactics in your personal Credit Guide, you will see the best results. That is why we are here, we are specialists in credit repair, and we can help you!

See what our customers have to say about us and then contact us for a free consultation today!

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Each person’s credit situation is unique. Results may vary, and CreditServices.com makes no guarantee of any particular result. The information in this site is intended for general informational purposes only, and is not to be construed as legal, tax, accounting, or other professional advice.  As such, it should not be used as, or relied upon, as a substitute for seeking professional legal, tax, accounting, or other advice. All information in this site is provided “as-is”, with no guarantee of completeness, accuracy, timeliness, or other results obtained from its use. In no event is CreditServices.com, its Affiliates, or their agents or employees liable to you or anyone else for any decision made or action taken in reliance on the information in this site. “Affiliate” means any entity that directly or indirectly owns or controls, is owned or controlled by, or is under common ownership or common control of the party in question.