The Best Mortgage Rates

Most consumers planning to obtain a home loan are looking around to find the best interest rate possible for their situation. This is an important aspect to financing because a small fluctuation in your mortgage rate can mean tens of thousands of dollars difference over the life of your loan.

Here are some important tips to use so you can minimize your mortgage interest rate and maximize the use of your money:

Raise your credit score:

Lenders will look at your credit score to determine whether they will continue looking at your mortgage application or reject it immediately. The best mortgage rates are generally obtained by consumers with a FICO credit score of 740 and up.

Achieving a 740+ credit score requires attention to the factors that make up your credit score, and how much impact they have: payment history (35%), credit utilization ratio (30%), length of account history (15%), recent credit inquiries (10%), and the types of credit you use (10%).

Make your payments on time and keep your balances as low as possible, while still using at least 1% of your credit limit. Using a small portion of your credit limit keeps your credit cards active in the FICO formula and maximizes the impact of the credit utilization portion of your FICO score.

Improve your debt-to-income ratio:

First, consider your “front-end” debt ratio, this is the amount of your pre-tax monthly income that goes toward your mortgage payment, this should not exceed 28%. Develop a detailed budget before applying for a loan so you understand what you can afford on a monthly basis.

Second, your “back-end” debt ratio, or the portion of your monthly income that goes toward all forms of debt pay off including; mortgage, student loans, car loans, etc. should not exceed 36%.

To appear as a lower-risk borrower, take care of your “back-end” ratio to improve your debt-to-income ratio, while also improving your credit utilization.

Consider short-term fixed-rate mortgage:

You have a good chance of getting the best mortgage rate possible by choosing a 15 year fixed-rate mortgage over a 30 year fixed-rate mortgage. This option can improve your interest rate by as much as 0.8% compared to a 30 year loan.

However one of the risks of utilizing a 15 year mortgage may outweigh the reward for many buyers. Having a much higher monthly payment will put strains on your budget and may cause late payments. Choosing a 30 year loan and paying it off sooner won’t give you a lower interest rate, but it will allow you to pay your debt more according to your own terms, avoiding potentially being strapped for cash when you run into an unforeseen hardship.

Larger down payment:

Lenders can give you lower mortgage rates for the life of the loan if they can get more money upfront. This is called paying for points. A point is 1% of the borrowed amount, the more points you can buy, the lower your interest rate will be. The longer you plan to hold the loan, the more it makes sense to pay for the points that will save you money.

No matter what course of action you take to lower your mortgage interest rates, utilizing a combination of all these methods will surely provide the best results. Get creative in your efforts and remember the end result – saving money!

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Each person’s credit situation is unique. Results may vary, and CreditServices.com makes no guarantee of any particular result. The information in this site is intended for general informational purposes only, and is not to be construed as legal, tax, accounting, or other professional advice.  As such, it should not be used as, or relied upon, as a substitute for seeking professional legal, tax, accounting, or other advice. All information in this site is provided “as-is”, with no guarantee of completeness, accuracy, timeliness, or other results obtained from its use. In no event is CreditServices.com, its Affiliates, or their agents or employees liable to you or anyone else for any decision made or action taken in reliance on the information in this site. “Affiliate” means any entity that directly or indirectly owns or controls, is owned or controlled by, or is under common ownership or common control of the party in question.

Negative Items On Your Credit?

Many of your neighbors, friends, and coworkers are unable to take advantage of the best, or even average interest rates on credit cards, auto loans, and mortgages. The best interest rates are only for those with excellent credit. So if you want to take advantage of historically low interest rates before they rise, you need to take a look at your credit, and get active improving your profile.

Most Americans are also unaware of what makes up their credit score, including what will make it subprime, and how long these negative items stick to your credit profile. So how long do some of these negative items impact your financial situation?

Bankruptcy:

One of the most negative items you can have on your profile is a bankruptcy. Chapter 13 bankruptcies will stay on your credit report for 7 years, while a Chapter 7 bankruptcy will impact your credit score for 10 years from the date that you filed for the paperwork. If your bankruptcy was dismissed and your debts weren’t discharged, then it will stay on your report for 10 years from the date it was dismissed. If you had a strong credit score in the past and you declare bankruptcy, you will see a large impact on your credit score. If you previously had subprime or bad credit, then the impact of bankruptcy won’t be as great. If your bankruptcy included numerous accounts, the impact can be serious.

Lawsuits and Judgments:

If you have been sued, or had a judgment against you, it will also stay on your credit report for up to 7 years from the date it was filed, made against you, or until the statute of limitations has expired. Once you have paid off the judgment against you, even though paid off, it will impact your credit score for 7 years.

Tax Liens:

Even when you pay them off as soon as possible, the tax lien will stay on your credit report for 7 years.

Delinquent Accounts:

A delinquent account will also affect your credit profile for 7 years from the date that the account was declared delinquent. If you catch up on your payments, and maintain a good payment history, the negative mark will still remain for 7 years. Payment history makes up 35% of your FICO score. This, combined with the fact that the negative mark will stay on your report for 7 years is why on-time payments are crucial to having a good credit score.

Repossessions and Collections:

Any time that you have an account referred to a collection agency, or have something like a car or major appliance repossessed, it will have an impact on your credit score. These marks will stay on your credit report for 7 years plus 6 months after the first missed payment. If there is a charge-off marked on your report, that means that after the 6 months of non-payment, the company has removed it from their balance sheet, but you still owe the debt. Unpaid debts on your credit profile will make it difficult to get any credit in the future. Take care of your debts on time unless you want them to stick with you for 7 years or more.

Child Support:

Just like any other legally binding debt such as credit card payments, mortgage payments, or student loans, if you get behind, or make late payments, they will remain on your credit report for 7 years. Treat them like any other account, and make the payments on time.

Student Loans:

Student loan debt is guaranteed or insured by the federal government, so they carry much more serious consequences than other types of debt. You cannot discharge student loans by declaring bankruptcy, and defaulting on your student loans will stay on your credit report for much longer than 7 years.

Credit Inquiries:

Inquiries will show up on your credit any time that you apply for a new form of credit. They can stay on your report for 2 years, but only impact your score for the first 12 months. This will not have a disastrous impact on your score, however, they cost you 5-15 points each, so too many inquiries can significantly lower your credit score.

What you can do to clean up your credit profile:

While it is not an easy process, disputing the accounts on your profile can help you get rid of some of the negative remarks on your profile. Aside from challenging your negative accounts, CreditServices.com will teach you how to build positive accounts on your credit profile to counteract any negatives that might remain, speeding up the process of improving your financial situation.

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Each person’s credit situation is unique. Results may vary, and CreditServices.com makes no guarantee of any particular result. The information in this site is intended for general informational purposes only, and is not to be construed as legal, tax, accounting, or other professional advice.  As such, it should not be used as, or relied upon, as a substitute for seeking professional legal, tax, accounting, or other advice. All information in this site is provided “as-is”, with no guarantee of completeness, accuracy, timeliness, or other results obtained from its use. In no event is CreditServices.com, its Affiliates, or their agents or employees liable to you or anyone else for any decision made or action taken in reliance on the information in this site. “Affiliate” means any entity that directly or indirectly owns or controls, is owned or controlled by, or is under common ownership or common control of the party in question.

Save On Your Next Car: 6 Tips

Purchasing a new vehicle can be a very stressful situation. Make sure you do all of the research that you need in order to feel comfortable making your decision, and you won’t leave with a sense of buyer’s remorse.

Here are 6 important tips that will help you save money on your next car.

1.Find your financing before you shop.

It is widely known that paying cash will save you the most money on your new vehicle purchase (as you will not be paying any interest). However, if you are unable to dish out the cash, explore your financial options outside of the dealerships or car lots. Obtain pre-approval from your bank or credit union for the lowest interest rate possible, potentially saving you thousands. Independent financing will give you more buying power than relying on the finance department at the dealership.

  1. Check your credit profile.

The interest rate you receive depends significantly on your credit score. Your credit score is used by lenders to determine how risky it is to lend you money, and will adjust the interest rates according to their evaluation. In order to make sure the lender’s assessment of you is as accurate as possible, check your credit reports for inaccuracies. Do this a few months before shopping so there is time to fix these inaccuracies and improve the interest rate you receive.

  1. Compare available APRs.

Typically, the loan rates you are offered are shown as an annual percentage rate or APR. APR includes interest and fees, allowing you to compare loans in an apples-to-apples fashion. A lower APR will save you money over the length of your loan and lower your monthly payment. In order to determine which type of loan will work best for you, use an online loan calculator to experiment with loan amounts, interest rates and loan terms.

  1. Avoid long-term loans.

Longer-term auto loans have become increasingly popular as monthly budgeting concerns are often taken into consideration more than the total price paid over the life of the loan. Terms as long as 84 months are being reported more frequently than ever before. Though these loans are gaining in popularity, this does not mean they are a good idea. A longer loan will provide lower monthly payments but you will end up paying much higher interest. Keep your term as short as you can while still being able to fit it in your budget.

  1. Compare rates and terms.

Shop around for the best interest rates and loan terms available. A dealership may be able to offer you the best rates for your situation, with some new car purchases being financed at 0% for 60-72 months to buyers with great credit. If the dealership is not offering incentives on brand new vehicles, credit unions will likely offer you the best rates, educate yourself on your options.

  1. Focus on total cost.

Don’t get burned, concentrate on the total cost of the loan you are applying for rather than the monthly payment. The best options for lowering the total amount of your loan are to bring in a trade-in or a significant down payment.

The bottom line:

Do your research, exercise your options, and make sure your credit is going to help you obtain approval. If your credit leaves some room for improvement, CreditServices.com can help you.

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Each person’s credit situation is unique. Results may vary, and CreditServices.com makes no guarantee of any particular result. The information in this site is intended for general informational purposes only, and is not to be construed as legal, tax, accounting, or other professional advice.  As such, it should not be used as, or relied upon, as a substitute for seeking professional legal, tax, accounting, or other advice. All information in this site is provided “as-is”, with no guarantee of completeness, accuracy, timeliness, or other results obtained from its use. In no event is CreditServices.com, its Affiliates, or their agents or employees liable to you or anyone else for any decision made or action taken in reliance on the information in this site. “Affiliate” means any entity that directly or indirectly owns or controls, is owned or controlled by, or is under common ownership or common control of the party in question.

Lowering Student Debt: 5 Tips

The burden of student loan debt can prevent you from buying a home, starting your dream career, or even settling down with a family. Here are a few tips to get those student loans paid off faster so you can get started toward your goals sooner.

  1. Get a second job before settling down.

If you have proven your ability to comfortably live off of your first job, the income from a second job can be put directly into your student loans. Continue making the monthly payment that you have been, then add your second income on top of that to accelerate the process.

  1. Refinance your student loans.

This is where strong credit can really go to work for you and benefit your repayment efforts. There are a few very competitive options for refinancing federal and private student loans, enrolling in automatic payments could provide you new rates as low as 2%! Refinancing at a lower rate can reduce your minimum payment, keep making your original payment or more and you will pay off your debt faster.

  1. Reconsider big-ticket purchases.

One of the best things about being a graduated adult is spending like one. Vacations, nice dinners, new cars and apartments are all fun, but if they are taking up half of your monthly budget, it will be wise to cut back and put more money toward your student loans.

  1. Live at home with your parents.

Yes, we said it, live at home with your parents. If this is an option, you can really improve your student loan situation. Find out what you could be paying for rent in an apartment, then add this amount to your monthly student loan payment or split it and invest part of the extra money.

  1. Write a detailed budget with a loan payment plan.

Tracking your money as it comes in and knowing where it will go may give you some peace of mind. Your budget needs to be detailed so you can find any black holes where your money might be going. Making sure your loans are accounted for and adding any additional funds to them will help you pay your loans, and be a smarter spender.

Put these 5 tips together and you will surely be paying your loans off much quicker. Don’t be another college grad that goes delinquent on their student loans. Your debt may be debilitating now, but collections, judgments, and bad credit can make your situation worse.

 

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Each person’s credit situation is unique. Results may vary, and CreditServices.com makes no guarantee of any particular result. The information in this site is intended for general informational purposes only, and is not to be construed as legal, tax, accounting, or other professional advice.  As such, it should not be used as, or relied upon, as a substitute for seeking professional legal, tax, accounting, or other advice. All information in this site is provided “as-is”, with no guarantee of completeness, accuracy, timeliness, or other results obtained from its use. In no event is CreditServices.com, its Affiliates, or their agents or employees liable to you or anyone else for any decision made or action taken in reliance on the information in this site. “Affiliate” means any entity that directly or indirectly owns or controls, is owned or controlled by, or is under common ownership or common control of the party in question.

Avoiding Bankruptcy

Life and finances can be very unexpected and difficult to manage, you may find yourself getting deeper and deeper in debt, sometimes to the point where it is impossible to meet all of your financial obligations. Debt settlement allows you an option other than declaring bankruptcy.

The goal of Debt Settlement is to get creditors to mark your debt as completely satisfied in exchange for a partial payment.

Many of our clients have seen success with our preferred debt settlement affiliate, DebtServices.com, their experienced negotiators understand lenders, and the policies and procedures that they follow. Lenders would rather receive a partial payment than none at all, which is very possible if you declare bankruptcy.

As debt negotiation specialists, DebtServices.com will work on your behalf to save you the most possible money in your debt settlement. This will allow you to get your finances back on track, improve your profile, and move toward living your life the way you want to live it.

Don’t let debt weigh you down. Take action now!

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Each person’s credit situation is unique. Results may vary, and CreditServices.com makes no guarantee of any particular result. The information in this site is intended for general informational purposes only, and is not to be construed as legal, tax, accounting, or other professional advice.  As such, it should not be used as, or relied upon, as a substitute for seeking professional legal, tax, accounting, or other advice. All information in this site is provided “as-is”, with no guarantee of completeness, accuracy, timeliness, or other results obtained from its use. In no event is CreditServices.com, its Affiliates, or their agents or employees liable to you or anyone else for any decision made or action taken in reliance on the information in this site. “Affiliate” means any entity that directly or indirectly owns or controls, is owned or controlled by, or is under common ownership or common control of the party in question.

Avoid These Common Credit Card Mistakes

  1. Getting too many credit cards:

While having a good debt-available credit ratio will build your credit and look favorable to lenders, if you have too much available credit, a lender may think: “What if they decide to max out all of these cards, what would the debt-income ratio be?” Not to mention that multiple credit inquiries will lower your credit score and may lead a lender to believe you are desperate for more money.

  1. Paying your bill late:

Not only will you face a late payment charge that may be higher than your minimum payment, this will show up on your credit report and lower your credit score.

  1. Ignoring your monthly statement:

Avoid late payments by checking your monthly credit card statements. Checking your monthly credit card statements will also allow you to make sure charges are correct, and catch identity theft, if you wait too long it may show up on your credit report.

  1. Exceeding your credit limit:

If you are approaching the top of your credit limit, try to use cash for subsequent purchases. If you don’t, your purchase may be rejected, unless you have authorized your card company to charge hefty over-the-limit fees.

  1. Misunderstanding introductory rates:

With introductory rates, often offered on big-ticket items, interest accumulates from the day of purchase. If you don’t pay off the debt during the introductory period, the interest will be charged retroactively, more than likely at a very high rate.

 

These are common mistakes made with credit cards that can damage your credit and hinder your ability to qualify for lending opportunities. The more you can learn about the terms of the credit cards you utilize, and credit card use in general, the better you will be able to manage your debt and position yourself for a strong credit score and financial life!

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Each person’s credit situation is unique. Results may vary, and CreditServices.com makes no guarantee of any particular result. The information in this site is intended for general informational purposes only, and is not to be construed as legal, tax, accounting, or other professional advice.  As such, it should not be used as, or relied upon, as a substitute for seeking professional legal, tax, accounting, or other advice. All information in this site is provided “as-is”, with no guarantee of completeness, accuracy, timeliness, or other results obtained from its use. In no event is CreditServices.com, its Affiliates, or their agents or employees liable to you or anyone else for any decision made or action taken in reliance on the information in this site. “Affiliate” means any entity that directly or indirectly owns or controls, is owned or controlled by, or is under common ownership or common control of the party in question.

Strong Credit; Financial Success

What Can Good Credit Do For You?

Having a good credit score shows lenders there is less risk in lending you money. Since you have a history of repaying your debts in a timely manner, you will be more likely to qualify for loans, larger lines of credit, and lower interest rates.

In today’s credit driven society, having good credit is key to getting the most out of your money because having good credit means that less of your money goes to interest and more goes toward the principal on your debts, leaving funds that would have been spent on interest to pay down debts or invest elsewhere.

Strategic decisions in the use of credit can be tremendously beneficial. This is where CreditServices.com comes in. As industry experts we teach our clients the most effective ways to build and manage their credit profile.

Strengthen your credit profile, and strengthen your purchasing power!

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Each person’s credit situation is unique. Results may vary, and CreditServices.com makes no guarantee of any particular result. The information in this site is intended for general informational purposes only, and is not to be construed as legal, tax, accounting, or other professional advice.  As such, it should not be used as, or relied upon, as a substitute for seeking professional legal, tax, accounting, or other advice. All information in this site is provided “as-is”, with no guarantee of completeness, accuracy, timeliness, or other results obtained from its use. In no event is CreditServices.com, its Affiliates, or their agents or employees liable to you or anyone else for any decision made or action taken in reliance on the information in this site. “Affiliate” means any entity that directly or indirectly owns or controls, is owned or controlled by, or is under common ownership or common control of the party in question.

Debt Delaying Home Ownership?

If you have outstanding collections, judgments, or tax liens holding you back from obtaining a mortgage, they will likely need to be resolved before moving forward. Having active management and negotiation on collection or judgment accounts during the course of your loan application process is important and in most cases a must have option to be successful.

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CreditServices.com™’s preferred debt settlement affiliate; DebtServices.com™, works on behalf of clients to lower their debt amounts and settle outstanding debts that are hindering loan obtainment.

One of the main reasons behind the creation and development of this partnership is to have a solution and ability to help structure a plan for consumers during their process of paying off any collection account. This strategic partnership delivers tremendous value because having activity on collection accounts that are reporting on one or more of the three major credit bureaus will trigger new up to date activity in the Date of Last Activity (DOLA) section of the credit report. This new activity will negatively impact the consumer’s overall credit risk by updating the reporting negative account to ‘current’ on your credit history section. This new activity and negative risk will in fact, lower your overall score(s).

CreditServices.com and the debt negotiation specialists at DebtServices.com work closely with each client as needed on which accounts to settle and when, in relation to their overall credit status and type of lending opportunity they are looking to obtain.

DebtServices.com has the ability to negotiate payment for deletion tactics, payment plan options, reduction of interest due, settlement of total amount with a fraction of the original cost, judgement services and the list goes on. Each step is taken in a matter that is to restrict and limit the amount of negative activity that takes place on the client’s credit report profile and score. The important aspect to all of this is that each step taken will be specific to the consumer’s overall goal and what is best for their situation.

DebtServices.com’s negotiation specialists have years of experience from working with thousands of settlements over the years, and industry connections that have been built through this work that directly benefit the consumer.

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Each person’s credit situation is unique. Results may vary, and CreditServices.com makes no guarantee of any particular result. The information in this site is intended for general informational purposes only, and is not to be construed as legal, tax, accounting, or other professional advice.  As such, it should not be used as, or relied upon, as a substitute for seeking professional legal, tax, accounting, or other advice. All information in this site is provided “as-is”, with no guarantee of completeness, accuracy, timeliness, or other results obtained from its use. In no event is CreditServices.com, its Affiliates, or their agents or employees liable to you or anyone else for any decision made or action taken in reliance on the information in this site. “Affiliate” means any entity that directly or indirectly owns or controls, is owned or controlled by, or is under common ownership or common control of the party in question.